Project Water Education – goal set on waste reduction #drinktapwater

Bottled water used in major events, especially sports events often produce a large amount of waste. Tap water in Finland is completely safe to drink, which is why it is our responsibility to provide a better and more sustainable option to water bottles – let the project Water Education begin!

Project Water Education in a nutshell

One of the main goals of the IAAF world U20 Championships is to reduce waste production. A huge step towards this goal is to use refillable water bottles and quality tap water. Instead of handing out new water bottles each time, athletes and volunteers are provided with refillable durable water bottles, which can be filled with fresh tap water. This way the bottles can be reused throughout the event and long after. The bottle also serves as a nice memento for the athletes.

To ensure fresh drinking water during the event at both competition areas, as well as training facilities, water from the local water supplier Tampereen Vesi is provided to where it normally is not available. To many visitors it might feel like a strange idea to fill a bottle with tap water – Yet, Finnish tap water is completely safe to enjoy and a pleasure to drink.

 

Restaurant Day and responsibility

During the worldwide food carnival Restaurant Day, held on the third Saturday of May, 19.5, the marketing team of the World Championships launched the project Water Education by setting up a water station in the Koskipuisto -park in Tampere. The first 200 visitors were given fresh drinking water from Tampereen Vesi in reusable water bottles. The project gained extremely positive feedback, along with popularity due to the conscious environmental choice. The importance of environmental responsibility is ever growing and even small changes and decisions move towards more sustainable actions.

 

Tampere U20 World Championships encourage each and every one to join the project Water Education – let’s reduce waste together by drinking tap water! #drinktapwater